was successfully added to your cart.

Harrogate-Pubs

Harrogate Pubs Including Knaresborough

By | Reviews | No Comments

Harrogate Pubs including Knaresborough by Paul Chrystal Amberley Publishing www.amberley-books.com (March 2016) £14.99 Reviewed by Dave Pickersgill  This 96-page book (100 illustrations) includes detailed comments on ‘the best of pubs‘, 15 in central Harrogate, eight in Knaresborough and another 22 in the local area. Also included are two local breweries: Daleside and Roosters. Each entry includes full address, phone number and weblink. A number of closed pubs are also listed. The introduction covers a wide range and includes a short history of the development of pubs, changes in brewing and the effect of changing modes of transport. For example, the growth of the railways and…

Read More

The Quakers and the English chocolate industry

By | Author Blog | No Comments

Both the Fry and Cadbury families were of course Quakers and, like the Rowntrees in York, one of their priorities was to provide their workers with as good working conditions as possible. As well as that, Cadbury and Rowntree provided sanitary and comfortable housing, educational, social and recreational facilities. Joseph Fry employed a nurse and a doctor to attend to the medical problems of his staff; ran ‘continuation classes’, or further education, for the girls, provided a gym with instructors, facilities and pitches for football, tennis, cricket and bowls and organised the Operatic Society, the Camera Club, the Debating and…

Read More

THE SUPERSITIOUS ROMAN: talking cows and weeping horses

By | Author Blog | No Comments

Superstition was rife and omnipresent in the Roman world, presumably as much amongst women as men. Persius singles out god-fearing grandmothers and aunts, in his satire on the inefficacy of men’s clandestine prayers to the gods. Prayers are expert in averting the evil eye and may predict a life of extravagant wealth, a good marriage, an altogether rosy life: but Persius is far from convinced and no nurse will ever hear a prayer from Perseus . Juvenal too satirises the anxia mater at the temple of Venus for optimistically wishing her daughter’s beauty 1. In a world where it was…

Read More

Wayward Julia Augusti (39 BC – AD 14), daughter of the world’s most powerful man

By | Author Blog | No Comments

Julia Augusti, or Julia Caesaris, was the only blood child of Octavian, later Augustus, the only child from his politically motivated marriage with Scribonia, his second wife ; Julia was born in 39 BC, step-sister and, later, second wife of Tiberius, maternal grandmother of Caligula and Agrippina the Younger, grandmother through marriage of Claudius, and maternal great-grandmother of Nero. Livia, then, was Julia’s stepmother, Antonia her husband’s (Tiberius’) stepsister. Julia’s birthday could not have been less auspicious: she was born the day on which Octavian divorced her mother to marry Livia Drusilla. Initially, Julia may have lived with her mother…

Read More

The Feckless Fifties

By | Author Blog | No Comments

York is one of the few British cities that is blessed with authoritative, extensive and detailed research on its social life and activity. Benjamin Seebohm Rowntree (1871 – 1954) first reported on York’s social situation in 1899,   inspired and stimulated by the research work of his father Joseph Rowntree in York, and of Charles Booth in London. One of the first statistical studies ever conducted, his comprehensive, no holds barred, no stone unturned survey into the living conditions of the York poor involved investigators visiting almost every working class home; in other words 11,560 families or 46,754 individuals. Rowntree’s findings…

Read More

John Wilhelm Rowntree’s racism and the Banderlogs

By | Author Blog | No Comments

Describing a mix of chocolate business and sightseeing, John Wilhelm’s Mexico diaries are fascinating, if not, at times, somewhat disturbing: the ‘copper coloured’ coolies were ‘comely women to look at, small and graceful, and with such a carriage … [with]strikingly refined faces in sharp contrast to chattering wooly-pated niggers with their coarse features, obtrusive manners, and overflowing conceit. The nigger is to the white what the Banderlog were to the jungle … they are hopelessly incompetent, incorrigibly idle, overpowering in their conceit and more effervescent than the Parisians … They are however very picturesque and the women … carry themselves…

Read More

Witch-lite: The Bogeywoman is Coming to Get You

By | Author Blog | No Comments

In ancient Greece and Rome not all aspiring witches made the grade. But all was not lost to those intent on following the chthonic way of life. Anyone who failed proficiency in witchcraft could always qualify as that sister of witches – the scary bogeywoman, just as malevolent and equally repulsive. Some of Greece’s pre-eminent philosophers believed that ‘of all wild things, the child is most unmanageable…the most unruly animal there is. That’s why he has to be curbed by a great many bridles’. One of these bridles, apparently endorsed by flustered wet nurses, was the introduction of the bogeywoman…

Read More

The opening battles of the 1st Punic war

By | Author Blog | No Comments

Messana (264 BC) The First Punic War started with the battle of Messana. Messana (modern Messina) had been something of a rogue state since 288 BC when it was ruthlessly and mercilessly taken by a group of discharged and unscrupulous Campanian mercenaries who called themselves Mamertines, children of Mars, after the Oscan god of war, Mamers; they had originally been hired by Agathocles of Syracuse. The surviving Messanians were evicted, their property and women shared out between the mercenaries. In 264 BC an ambitious, expansionist King Hiero II of Syracuse laid siege to Messana with a promise to execute the…

Read More